I finished up Clone Wars (well, I skipped about 50-60 episodes, but oh well) and have now moved on to watching Green Lantern: The Animated Series on Netflix.  This is a vast improvement.

When this show first aired I was at a point where the comic was starting to sour on me and the movie had kinda farted on my GL enthusiasm.  Truth be told, if it was just The Hal Jordan and Kilowog Show I probably never would have got around to checking it out.  But then I heard about the whole Razer/Aya thing and I was intrigued.  Basically, the Green Lanterns capture an evil Red Lantern, but their spaceship realizes he’s not so bad and turns into a robot lady to talk to him and stuff.  Yeah.

I don’t want to make the show sound all shippy or whatever, because the first half really isn’t so much.  But it’s one of those things where the show leads you to want them to get together and they actually probably will get together.  I enjoy that efficiency.

peppermonster:

a very real world reaction to the superhero concept

I legit popped for this moment.

Not because superhero codenames are stupid, but because superhero codenames have to have context.  Logan’s known the X-Men for all of two minutes and they’re just tossing around “Magneto” and “Storm” without explaining why they would choose to to call those people by those names.  (To be fair, there are good reasons.)  Logan’s got a nickname too, but he’s not running up to these total strangers like “I’M THE WOLVERINE BUB SNIKT!”

This is a frequently recurring problem in the X-Men, because very few of them have secret identities and a lot of them aren’t even notorious enough to have public identities.  So the codenames end up feeling silly, like the characters know they’re in a comic book and need flashy superhero names.

In contrast, the Avengers movies handle this more smoothly.  People don’t call Tony Stark “Iron Man” very much, but a reason is still given for why he has the name—the papers called him that before they knew who was in the armor, and he liked it.

(via darkmajor)

If Captain America: The Winter Soldier had been a DC movie…

Nick Fury: SHIELD takes the world as it is, not as we’d like it to be!  And it’s about past time you get with the program!

Captain America: Okay.

asker

Anonymous asked: Hey! I'm really confused about the relationship between Clint and Karla Sofen? Could you explain?

bobbimorsed:

Yeah, sure. I don’t know too much about it, but I’ll try my best.

After Bobbi died, Clint left the West Coast Avengers and just went solo. He eventually offered to lead the Thunderbolts because he knew what it was like to be in their position of being a criminal and wanting to go straight. Clint and Karla started dating after a while.

Karla found out Clint had lied to the Thunderbolts about their pardons and went to prison for aiding fugitives. I think that was when they broke up. I don’t know about that, though.

If I’ve got any of this wrong, can someone correct me please.

Clint did go solo for a while after Bobbi “died,” but he rejoined the Avengers for a while before he took his services to the T-bolts.

The Thunderbolts were leery of letting one of their old adversaries into their ranks, but Hawkeye promised them that he had arranged federal pardons if they agreed to work with him.  When they found out the truth, their confidence in him was shaken, but he made it up to them by securing a pardon deal by turning himself in.

Karla and Clint were technically still a couple after that, although with Clint in prison they weren’t exactly seeing each other.  When they finally reunited, Karla argued that she couldn’t redeem herself with him hanging around, because she needed to do it for herself and not for him.  Hawkeye left to rejoin the Avengers, and that was their “official” breakup, I supppose.

They were an odd couple—Clint is a beer-and-pretzels fella, where Karla prefers wine and cheese.  At first, she was just hoping to seduce and manipulate him, to gain influence over the T-bolts.  What made it work, I think, is that Hawkeye was too focused on his goals to worry that she might have been toying with him.  So where some people would have responded to her advances with suspicion or naivete, Clint just took her at face value.  I think that had a disarming effect on Moonstone, so that instead of scheming and plotting she just let herself enjoy his company.

Unfortunately, they came to blows during a later Avengers/Thunderbolts battle, and Karla suffered a breakdown when she believed that Clint betrayed her.  I think that hit her very hard, accounting for some major changes in her behavior since then.  They both deal with it by not dealing with it.  For Clint it’s one of many epically failed romances, whereas for Karla it was really the one great love of her life.

junecovington:

(from captain america 192) ok oh my god i’m screaming first of all “yer piece?” the gun moll!!! language!!! so good a++ much gangster very criminal organization so wow second of all i’ve stumbled onto a definite weirdness god that might be my karla tag. #a definite weirdness. anyway i had a great time assuming that was a coloring error and karla spent that whole issue as a flight attendant packing heat while otherwise naked as a jaybird i just
steve’s discomfort
yes

For those who may have missed it, here’s the post explaining that the artist and the colorist for this issue probably disagreed on whether Karla is strutting around nude.

junecovington:

(from captain america 192) ok oh my god i’m screaming first of all “yer piece?” the gun moll!!! language!!! so good a++ much gangster very criminal organization so wow second of all i’ve stumbled onto a definite weirdness god that might be my karla tag. #a definite weirdness. anyway i had a great time assuming that was a coloring error and karla spent that whole issue as a flight attendant packing heat while otherwise naked as a jaybird i just

steve’s discomfort

yes

For those who may have missed it, here’s the post explaining that the artist and the colorist for this issue probably disagreed on whether Karla is strutting around nude.

junecovington:

i’ve been reading comics for almost 2 years and i’m yet again daunted by issues/numbering like what the hell was it that happened midway through thunderbolts where it was like half a dozen male-gaze issues that had nothing to do with actual thunderbolts (like #… 75-81? ish?) and then it picks back up with 100/new tbolts #1?????? and it makes little sense to me where it picks up like i feel like i am missing things in the plot???? AM I LITERALLY MISSING ISSUES or is this just entering self-parody levels of inaccessible

I can answer all of these questions!

Thunderbolts ran normally until issue #75, but sales were in decline.  In a bold and rather bizarre attempt to revamp the series, a new creative team was brought on board for #76, to start a completely unrelated story.  The justification was that Thunderbolts was about supervillains, and therefore the new storyline about completely different supervillains was still on-topic.

The new direction was promoted as being like Fight Club, so people started calling it “Fightbolts.”  (It was really not anything like Fight Club.)  I remember reading stuff about how this bold new vision was supposed to be superior to costumed bandits carrying bags with dollar signs on them, which made me wonder if anyone involved had ever actually read Thunderbolts before.  This was the era of Deadpool being relaunched as Agent X and Mark Waid almost getting fired from Fantastic Four, so there were a lot of dumb decisions being made at the time. 

Fightbolts alienated the existing audience and then failed to find one of its own.  Marvel quickly resorted to running pin-up girls on the covers before cancelling the series with #81.  About a year later, they tested the waters for a revival of the original T-bolts, with the Avengers/Thunderbolts six-issue miniseries.  Many fans considered those six issues to be the “real” #76-81.

New Thunderbolts #1 followed shortly thereafter—it was 2004 and Marvel was putting “New” on every title.  Each issue of New Thunderbolts had two issue numbers on it—#1 was unofficially #82 of the old series, for example.  After New Thunderbolts #18, they switched to Thunderbolts #100 because Marvel likes big round numbers.  The book’s numbering continued normally until it was renamed Dark Avengers with #175, and then cancelled altogether with Dark Avengers #190.

In 2013 Marvel launched a new Thunderbolts #1, again about a completely unrelated bunch of guys, because they haven’t learned a damn thing.

wrestling-is-fake:

Pat “CousinIt” Savino used this in his .sig on rec.sport.pro-wrestling back in the mid-’90s.  For some reason it’s always stuck with me.

wrestling-is-fake:

Pat “CousinIt” Savino used this in his .sig on rec.sport.pro-wrestling back in the mid-’90s.  For some reason it’s always stuck with me.

lemonsweetie:

Example of Star Trek Addressing Social Issues - Mental Illness 

This scene got me right in the gut when I first saw it. It was revealed earlier in the episode that Garak suffers from extreme claustrophobia, experiencing a severe attack just a few scenes before this one. I was already expecting Martok and Worf to dismiss Garak’s mental illness, especially because the Klingon Empire prides its people on physical strength. I was waiting for them to call him a coward, not “getting over it” like I’ve heard so many times in my own life about mental illness. But as seen above that’s not what happened, the exact opposite does. Its moments like this that make me love Star Trek, even for all its flaws. Sometimes I get to see past my conditioned reaction of the worst, and get to see the best in people instead.

TDLR; Star Trek may be about aliens in the future, but it connects to me on a human level - more than most modern shows do today. 

I like how this ties into Worf and Garak’s contentious scenes in the ship before they’re taken prisoner.  Worf is a man of honor and integrity and Garak is a man of lies and cynicism, so it seems like they have no common ground.  But they both recognize duty, in whatever form it takes.

A Klingon is not just some big jock who only respects power.  (The bad guy Klingons are like that, but they’re doing it wrong.)  The point for them is to overcome fear to combat any threat.  So even though Worf and Martok would think nothing of standing around in a crawlspace, they know that for Garak it’s like fighting a dozen Jem’Hadar with a broken rib.

It’s that empathy that makes Star Trek work, and cancels out the essentialism that (when done poorly) could make the aliens feel like caricatures.  A Klingon can appreciate how hard it is for a human to let someone suffer, a human can appreciate how hard it is for a Vulcan to admit pain, and so on.  You don’t always see that empathy—otherwise there’d be no conflict in the show.  But the general theme of Star Trek is that the universe would have less problems if it had more empathy.  That’s true in our universe too.

(via chroniclesofkanarnia)

some-hearts:

C-A-T-S CATS CATS CATS!

some-hearts:

C-A-T-S CATS CATS CATS!

junecovington:

carol vs. karla

photos by j. krolak

of special note is carol’s discomfort in the fourth photo. because i am actually choking her there. i am at least 80% sure this was unintentional. this fight was such a con highlight though guys like i can’t even properly articulate how much fun this was so i won’t try

just

ughfight. yes.

Kick her ass, Karla!

I wasn’t expecting this to depress me so much.

I wasn’t expecting this to depress me so much.

(via glenweldon)

fuckyeahthunderbolts:

Boomerang by stevelieber! Thanks, Steve. XD

fuckyeahthunderbolts:

Boomerang by stevelieber! Thanks, Steve. XD

rennerd:

THE BEST MEAL I’VE EVER HAD IN MY LIFE[a playlist for eden]



what's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom jonesit's not unusual - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom joneswhat's new pussycat - tom jones


[listen]

rennerd:

THE BEST MEAL I’VE EVER HAD IN MY LIFE
[a playlist for eden]

what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
it's not unusual - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones
what's new pussycat - tom jones

[listen]

(via stonecoldstunning)

junecovington:

i got two commissions this weekend and both were karla with the old mask tbh
let no one say i don’t know what i’m about
(this one is by mark bagley though like how could i not)

junecovington:

i got two commissions this weekend and both were karla with the old mask tbh

let no one say i don’t know what i’m about

(this one is by mark bagley though like how could i not)